fitness concept 3d render

Florida resident Edith Murway-Traina likes to spend time in the gym.

She might not be as agile as she was when she was a dancer. But at 100 years old, she’s still active and strong.

In fact, she holds a Guinness World Record for deadlifting 163 pounds and bench pressing 63 pounds.

Strength training for weight loss

If you need to lose weight, you might think you need to ramp up running, jogging or walking to tip the scale in the right direction.

But what if you have aches and pains or weaknesses that make that type of exercise hard?

You know…things like knee pain, back pain, poor balance, or lack of strength.

No cardio. No problem.

There’s another way…The Granny Method. If Edith can lift weights at 100 years old, so can you.

In one recent study, researchers found that strength training can be an effective way to:

    • Lose weight
    • Build muscle
    • Increase strength
    • Lower body fat percentage
    • Improve balance
    • Improve overall health

“We can use resistance training and achieve meaningful effects with a diet based on caloric reduction,” says lead researcher Pedro Lopez. “We can reduce body fat percentage, whole-body fat mass, body weight and BMI.”

Strength training guidelines for adults

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends adults strength train at least two days a week.

Strength training: Here are some easy ways to get started:

    • Take a strength training class
    • Work with a personal trainer
    • Lift weights at the gym
    • Choose an online workout video and follow along at home, or…
    • Do bodyweight exercises like squats, lunges, push-ups and crunches

Want to lose weight and keep it off, or maintain a healthy weight?

Make time for strength training. You’ll get stronger, feel better, and lower your risk for obesity and other chronic diseases.

Recommended Posts